week 45-46 on the farm - ableism identified

Hello all,

 

This week I had the good fortune and good sense to attend a dialogue on Disability Justice in the gardens and farms of Detroit, led by local activist Baba Baxter. I was introduced to the Social Model of disability, which states that disability is a social problem that can be cured by treating the social and material conditions of ableism.

 

I'm so grateful to be exposed to this new to me way of approaching the world. A quote behind the speakers read "My only handicap is your attitude." An important piece of this understanding also seems to be that ability is temporary.

 

 

The tanks! The tanks! Come spring, the hoophouse will be largely reliant on rain catchment.

The tanks! The tanks! Come spring, the hoophouse will be largely reliant on rain catchment.

 

 

I return again to imagination, and how important it is to our collective liberation and survival. Your imagination is your own innate possession, and it is also our society's best hope to continue along our healing pathways.

 

I sometimes find myself dissuading myself of idealized visions because of the 'practicality' drummed into my consciousness by the version of the world I've grown up in. The negative voices in my head, and your head, and society's multiple gnawing gnashing heads, are not our best bets. 

 

 

Collecting leaves is one of my favorite fall activities.

Collecting leaves is one of my favorite fall activities.

 

 

I'm inviting myself, and you, to imagine with my most loving and hopeful self, and keep imagining better and better versions of life and equity and justice. Let's keep expanding our consciousness to improve our imaginations.

 

 

This pic from April reminds us what's to come of all those bulbs we planted in the cold cold ground! The tulips will come...

This pic from April reminds us what's to come of all those bulbs we planted in the cold cold ground! The tulips will come...

 

 

Thanks for enabling my imagination all season long, 

 

Farmer Sarah

week 43-44 on the farm - the momentum of the orbit

Dear all,

 

I was talking with my mom recently about remembering, and the limits of remembering, and the need to let go of some memories. What's the word for the bittersweet knowledge that even in a moment, the memory you're creating may not stick with you? If a scarcity of relics encourages reverence for the few remaining pieces, what does a glut of relics encourage?

 

 

Fall colors on our japanese lilac bush.

Fall colors on our japanese lilac bush.

 

 

The beautiful 'products' that I create & sell from the farm have come to a close for the year. However, the garden itself offers much in the way of enjoyment and peace for the diligent observer. 

 

 

A lovely cart full of dusty miller & amaranth, at our last delivery to Mayesh.

A lovely cart full of dusty miller & amaranth, at our last delivery to Mayesh.

 

 

All practices ingrain habits and mindsets on us. Some practices we've created ourselves, with intention. Many practices we've inherited or absorbed from our families, friends, societies. It can be somewhat of a spiraling process, no? Whatever you center, you continue to be attracted to. It takes a lot of effort to center something else, but once you get in the groove, the momentum of the orbit can keep you in it with less and less effort (for better & for worse).

 

 

Amaranth, dianthus, dahlias, marigolds, dusty miller, strawflowers, kale, and eucalyptus make up our last week's deliveries.

Amaranth, dianthus, dahlias, marigolds, dusty miller, strawflowers, kale, and eucalyptus make up our last week's deliveries.

 

 

This is such a time of year for taking stock, and sharing. We're getting ready for some significant downtime, and some significant celebrating. I'm working on centering family and intimate relationships this time of year. I'm working on accepting the hard and sad and angering aspects of those relationships, as well as the joy and fun and light.

 

 

 

Uncle Shelbie & Ruti share a tender moment cleaning pepper plants in the hoophouse.

Uncle Shelbie & Ruti share a tender moment cleaning pepper plants in the hoophouse.

 

 

May we all have fun, love, and safety.

 

With love,

Sarah

week 41-42 on the farm - transforming our paradigms

Hello there all,

 

"Transformation requires us to actively seek to liberate ourselves from the thinking that surrounds us and from the habitats of action we have internalized, both as individuals and in groups. Simply put, we are likely to persist in thinking and acting on unconscious assumptions of separation, scarcity, powerlessness, and the importance of controlling the natural even when we no longer consciously believe in doing so.

 

A crush of bridesmaid bouquets wait to go out last week.

A crush of bridesmaid bouquets wait to go out last week.


Intellectual understanding of the devastating consequences wreaked by the legacy of separation from nature and from each other and the mistrust of both is not sufficient to create transformation. We could still re-create the old ways in our own actions because the inherited stories continue to live inside us. This is no surprise, because every social order reproduces itself through instilling such stories and habits in us through the process of socialization, the fundamental way in which the social enters the personal and persists. It is the very nature of this process - so personal, so deep, and so pervasive - that is one of the core obstacles to social change."

 

-From "Spinning Threads of Radical Aliveness," by Miki Kashtan.

 

A lovely end of season weekly bouquet we delivered to Pie Sci this week. Have you been yet?

A lovely end of season weekly bouquet we delivered to Pie Sci this week. Have you been yet?

 

The book I quoted above is one of many sources I've been plumbing lately to help bring words to the sadness I've been feeling and the anger that's been building about the inadequacies of the systems which I have inherited. 

 

How am I, as a small business owner, bound by the assumptions and paradigms in which I've been raised? How have those paradigms been upended in the recent generations of my family? (In many ways, over and over...) Spending time with older relatives, and gathering the stories & trying to name their assumptions, is a great way to look backward and take stock of those changes as they've happened.

 

The attic is filling with drying flowers to keep us happy in darker days.

The attic is filling with drying flowers to keep us happy in darker days.

 

I'd like the farm to grow more as a mechanism of togetherness. I'd like the flowers to grow more as a mechanism of consciousness to the earth & our interdependent web of life. I'd like farm visits to grow more as intergenerational connectivity spaces that light people from within and build safety & resilience. I'd also like the business to earn enough to offer significant compensation to the people who labor for it. 

 

This is where I'm stuck lately - within our capitalist system, finding & exploiting the potential profits to enough extent to pay even 1 person enough that they can, or we can afford together, health insurance, car payments, rent or mortgage, and then some... it seems prohibited by scale, and by loss of pleasure. It seems prohibited by a lack of models of farmers and farm workers being paid, outside of government subsidies, through the so-called 'free market,' enough to live as well as they should. 

 

This agricultural endeavor whose living memory & truth is so based on uneven & violent exploitation, and complicated trade subsidies which are themselves traded around to bolster or suppress political agendas.

 

When I ground myself in the practice of growing and designing flowers for local people to celebrate & mourn with, it makes sense. When I ground myself in the joy of providing a venue for local people to interact with an explicitly beautiful version of the natural world, it makes sense. When I place myself in the position of manager trying to use the economic system of our time to generate livelihoods for myself & others, it starts to stretch the limits of my comfort. But I still retain hope that a few more infrastructure investments will get us closer to that sustainable balance. 

 

A favorite bridal bouquet of last week, shown off on our historic kitchen wallpaper.

A favorite bridal bouquet of last week, shown off on our historic kitchen wallpaper.

 


From ancient longing to current reality, in love,

 

Farmer Sarah

 

Dahlias & Ruti join together to be some of the prettiest things on the farm.

Dahlias & Ruti join together to be some of the prettiest things on the farm.